Big Game, Big Taste: Healthy Super Bowl Snacks

Whether you watch for the football, the halftime show or the advertisements, you’re probably getting ready for the big game – and that usually means a big menu. Instead of opting for the usual game day treats, try one of these tooth-friendly substitutions for a pigskin party that’s delicious and nutritious.

Chicken wings, minus the sweet BBQ sauce.

If the sauce is sweet, it’s likely loaded with brown sugar. Instead, opt for a mustard- or vinegar-based wing sauce. If you prefer spicy wings, try using spicy brown mustard. For an exotic twist, make a sauce with curry spice and yogurt.[1]

White bean dip.

For a healthier veggie dip, try making your own with a can of cannellini (white kidney) beans, lemon juice, olive oil, garlic and rosemary. Beans are full of fiber, which keeps you full longer and deters food cravings. They’re also rich in antioxidants.[2] Check online for a quick and easy recipe.

Deviled eggs.

Phosphorous helps build enamel – and eggs happen to be a very good source of the mineral.[3] Deviled eggs are always a crowd pleaser. To add an extra tooth-boosting oomph to yours, skip the mayo and mix mustard with Greek yogurt instead. Yogurt is a great way to get the recommended daily amount of calcium.[4]

Swap a few of your usual appetizers out for some of these, and you’ll be celebrating a healthy mouth long after the touchdowns are scored.

[1] http://www.bostonmagazine.com/health/blog/2013/07/12/healthy-chicken-wing-recips/

[2] http://healthyeating.sfgate.com/benefits-white-kidney-beans-4420.html

[3] http://www.rd.com/health/wellness/3-surprising-ways-to-keep-your-teeth-healthy/

[4] http://www.fannetasticfood.com/recipes/healthy-deviled-eggs/

Colds, Coughs… and Cavities?

You’re probably aware that candy leads to cavities and sugary drinks can also cause decay. But cough syrup? Unfortunately, it’s true – certain syrupy medications can cause tooth troubles, especially if they’re consistently taken over a long period of time.

The antihistamine syrups you can buy over-the-counter to help you and your kids combat the flu or allergies often have high acidity and low pH levels. These medications can also contain sugar to help with the taste. Combined, those factors are like a one-two punch for teeth, working together to dissolve tooth enamel and cause erosion.[1]

Don’t worry – we’re not suggesting you suffer through seasonal ailments without any relief. Just follow these four tips to make sure the medicine doesn’t do more harm than good.

  • Avoid taking syrup medication right before bed. Since saliva flow naturally decreases at night, the residue won’t rinse away like it would during the day.
  • If there’s no way around a bedtime dose, make sure to rinse with water afterward.
  • Try to take medications with meals. Chewing increases saliva flow, which helps wash away sugars and acids.
  • Talk to your child’s dentist about a topical fluoride, which helps keep decay at bay.[2]

 With the proper precautions and good oral health habits, you’ll be able to keep colds, coughs and cavities away this season!

[1] http://www.today.com/id/32332021/ns/today-today_health/t/surprising-things-ruining-your-teeth/#.VKGqCsACzU

[2] http://oralhealth.deltadental.com/Search/22,DD39

Little evidence to support benefits of oil pulling

If you follow health or celebrity news you’ve likely heard the buzz on the latest natural health craze to hit the internet: Oil Pulling.

As the name suggests, the practice involves using about a tablespoon of oil – typically sesame or coconut, preferably organic – as a mouthwash. The oil is swished and “pulled” through the mouth for upwards of 20 minutes per session before being spit out into the trash. This ancient Hindu Ayurvedic medicine remedy is said to have a laundry list of health benefits, among which are common dental health concerns: preventing tooth decay, gum disease and bad breath as well as whitening teeth.

While there are numerous articles with claims and personal stories supporting the practice of oil pulling, there is little scientific evidence to support these assertions. There is, however, significant evidence that a preventive oral care routine including brushing teeth for about two minutes twice daily with fluoride toothpaste, flossing daily and visiting a dentist regularly can prevent dental disease.

There is likely little harm in trying oil pulling, other than possible discomfort from the lengthy swishing process. If you do decide to try this or any other alternative medicine or natural remedy, we encourage you to consider it a complement to a proven preventive dental care routine. You may also want to check with your physician or dentist to make sure that alternative practices will not interfere with any medications or affect other problems that you may have.

Three reasons to smile during National Smile Month

Just in time for National Smile Month, we present three reasons to smile:

1. Smile for Beauty’s Sake: According to a survey of more than 1,000 Americans nationwide, a smile is the most important physical feature that contributes to a person’s overall attractiveness. Nearly one-half of Americans (47 percent) cited the smile as the most important physical feature, followed by eyes (27 percent) and physique (16 percent). Men and women agreed on the order, though women said they put more emphasis on a person’s eyes.

2. Smile for Success: More than six of 10 Americans (64 percent) say a smile has some bearing on a person’s overall success.

3. Smile with Satisfaction: More than six of 10 Americans (64 percent) say they like their smile, and almost a third (31 percent) wouldn’t change a thing about it. Those who would change their smile most frequently cited cosmetic improvements such as whitening or straightening of teeth.

So get out there and celebrate National Smile Month with a smile – for whatever reason you choose!

Morpace, Inc. conducted the Delta Dental Oral Health and Well-Being Survey on behalf of Delta Dental with 1,003 consumers across the United States.

Use the Tooth Fairy as a teaching tool

In 2013, the Tooth Fairy visited 86 percent of U.S. homes with children who lost a tooth. What kid doesn’t love a magical fairy that leaves goodies beneath their pillow? This built-in goodwill towards and interest in the Tooth Fairy opens the door for parents to use this little lady as a teaching tool when it comes to the importance of oral health.

In honor of National Tooth Fairy Day (February 28) here are a few suggestions for ways to use the Tooth Fairy to teach kids about good dental health habits:

  • Introduce the Tooth Fairy early on. Kids will start losing baby teeth around age 6. Before this age, parents can teach kids about the Tooth Fairy and let them know that good oral health habits and healthy teeth make her happy. Use this as an opportunity to brush up on a child’s everyday dental routine. Kids not wanting to brush and floss? Remind them that the Tooth Fairy is only looking for healthy baby teeth, not teeth with cavities. This will help get kids excited about taking care of their teeth.
  • Leave a note reinforcing good habits. A personalized note from the Tooth Fairy could be nearly as exciting for kids as the gift itself. Parents should include tips for important oral health habits that the Tooth Fairy wants kids to practice, such as brushing twice a day, flossing once a day and visiting the dentist twice a year. In fact, we’ve created some sample letters to get you started!
  • Give oral health gifts. Although the Tooth Fairy left cash for kids in 99 percent of homes she visited, a few children received toys, gum or other gifts. Consider forgoing cash and reinforce good oral health habits by providing a new toothbrush with their favorite cartoon character or fun-flavored toothpaste. How about a new book? There are several children’s books about Tooth Fairy adventures that can add to the Tooth Fairy excitement. Also gone are the days of worrying about not being able to find the tiny tooth under your child’s pillow in the middle of the night. Special Tooth Fairy pillows with tiny, tooth-sized pockets attached are now available in many themes and can even be customized with your child’s name. But if the family tradition has always included money, you don’t have to stop. Consider giving both cash and a new toothbrush to reinforce good oral health habits.

DDPA Tooth Fairy 2013 Poll Infographic web 2014For more information and ways to make your child’s Tooth Fairy experience extra special, visit www.theoriginaltoothfairypoll.com

How Many Dental X-Rays Do Your Kids Need?

Young Teen at DentistFebruary is National Children’s Dental Health Month, the perfect time to take your kids to the dentist for one of their regular visits. But before you do, Delta Dental encourages you to be well-informed about how often your child should have dental X-rays.

The purpose of X-rays is to allow dentists to see signs of disease or potential problems that are not visible to the naked eye. They are should be suggested after the dentist has done a clinical exam and considered any signs and symptoms, oral and medical history, diet, hygiene, fluoride use and other factors that might suggest a higher risk of hidden dental disease.

However, all X-rays use ionizing radiation that can potentially cause damage. Though it is spread out in tiny doses, the effect of radiation from years of X-rays is cumulative. The risks associated with this radiation are greater for children than for adults. So be sure that your dentist checks your child’s teeth, health history and risk factors before deciding an X-ray is necessary.

“X-rays are an important tool for dentists to diagnose dental diseases. However, they do not need to be part of every exam,” said Dr. Bill Kohn, DDS, Delta Dental Plans Association’s vice president of dental science and policy. “They should be ordered only after the dentist has examined the mouth and has determined that X-rays are needed to make a proper diagnosis. In general, children and adults at low risk for tooth decay and gum disease need X-rays less frequently.”

Ideally, your dentist should adhere to the guidelines established by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and the American Dental Association. The following chart, adapted from those guidelines, gives a basic timeline for recommended frequency of X-rays by age group. Keep in mind that multiple factors such as the child’s current oral health, future risk for disease, and developmental stage determine need, and some children will require more X-rays, and some fewer.

Ages

First visit

Routine recall visit

Routine recall visit

Active tooth decay or   history of cavities (Increased Risk)

No active tooth decay   or history of cavities (Low Risk)

Young children(ages 1 – 5),   with no permanent teeth Personalized exam which may consist of bitewing X-rays of back teeth (if no gaps exist between teeth that allow the dentist to examine the sides of teeth) and select individual X-rays, usually of front teeth. Bitewing X-rays every six to 12 months Bitewing X-rays every 12 to 24 months
Older children (ages 6 – 12), with some or all permanent teeth Personalized exam consisting of bitewing X-rays of back teeth and select individual X-rays, usually of front teeth; or a panoramic X-ray. Bitewing X-rays every six to 18 months Bitewing X-rays every 12 to 36 months
Adolescent, with permanent teeth but no wisdom teeth Personalized exam consisting of   bitewing X-rays of back teeth and select individual X-rays; or a panoramic X-ray; or a full mouth survey of X-rays if evidence of widespread oral disease. Bitewing X-rays every six to 18 months Bitewing X-rays every 12 to 36 months

Many people believe that if their dental plan pays for a certain number of X-rays, they should take advantage of that benefit. For most patients, however, this yearly X-ray exposure is excessive and unnecessary. Don’t let your insurance coverage dictate your decision. If you have questions or concerns related to dental X-rays, discuss them with your dentist.

 

Source: http://www.fda.gov/downloads/Radiation-EmittingProducts/RadiationEmittingProductsandProcedures/ MedicalImaging/MedicalX-Rays/UCM329746.pdf  (Accessed February 11, 2014).

Delta Dental Offers Alternative Approach to Resolutions

Failure to keep New Year’s resolutions is so commonplace these days that it has become an easy punch line for many derisive jokes. Studies have found only eight percent of people actually keep their resolutions annually. Conversely, one out of four people have never successfully kept a New Year’s resolution.

Maybe the problem is how you think of these resolutions, and simply changing your mindset might help. In 2014, take a cue from the 2007 movie The Bucket List, and put together a list of things that you must do before the year ends.

We at Delta Dental suggest you consider including some oral health-related items in your bucket list. Dr. Bill Kohn, DDS, DDPA’s vice president of dental science and policy, has a few time-honored suggestions:

  • Brush/floss regularly: Commit to brushing your teeth twice a day for two minutes at a time. Simple tools like egg timers or mobile apps can help you keep track of the time. If you never, ever floss, pledge to do so more frequently (starting with once a week and increasing to once a day).
  • Easy on the sweets: Limit your consumption of sugary snacks because the more times teeth are exposed to sugar, the longer acids have time to attack tooth enamel – and expedite tooth decay!
  • Kick butts: Cigarette smoking is the primary cause of severe gum disease in the U.S., so do yourself a favor and quit using tobacco products. Your teeth, gums and lungs will thank you.

Fill your bucket list with things that will make you happy and healthy, provide some adventure, and encourage personal growth. The length of your list doesn’t matter, but you should write it down and refer to it regularly throughout the year. Keep it simple and try to do at least one thing on your list each month.

An appointment with your dentist should be at the top of any healthy checklist. Like most things that we value and want to keep working properly, a regular dental check-up and some preventive maintenance goes a long way towards maintaining long-term, disease-free oral health.

Delta Dental sends you our best wishes for a happy, healthy and prosperous 2014!