Resolve to Kick Butts in 2012

Of the nearly 8,000 deaths in the United States attributed to oral and pharyngeal cancer annually,1 about 75 percent are due to tobacco and heavy alcohol use.2   Resolving to quit smoking may be one of the most difficult challenges to undertake in 2012, but it also comes with some of the best life- and mouth-saving benefits.

A lifestyle factor that the Surgeon General calls “the single greatest avoidable cause of death,”3 smoking also drastically affects periodontal (gum) health.4-5 According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), half of the cases of severe gum disease in U.S adults can be attributed to cigarette smoking and the prevalence of gum disease is three times higher among smokers than nonsmokers.6

Smoking is the leading cause of oral and pharyngeal cancer and using tobacco in any form – including dipping snuff 7 or chewing – increases the risk of developing an oral cancer.8 Even if you’ve smoked for decades, you can reap nearly immediate benefits by quitting.9-11 Within 20 minutes, your heart rate drops, and within 12 hours, the carbon monoxide level in your blood returns to normal. Within one year, your added risk for coronary heart disease will fall to half that of a smoker’s, and within 15 years, your risk is that of a nonsmoker’s.10 Quitting reduces many of the cosmetic effects of smoking and can even improve sensitivity to smell and taste.

There are many reasons why smoking is a health risk, but here are the top five ways that kicking butts can immediately improve your oral health:

  1. It significantly reduces your risk of developing oral and pharyngeal cancer
  2. It reduces your risk of developing periodontal disease
  3. It improves the color of your teeth
  4. It can help eliminate halitosis (bad breath)
  5. It can help reduce dental decay12

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1 National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health – Oral Cancer http://www.cancer.gov/cancertopics/types/oral

2 Blot WJ, McLaughlin JK, Winn DM, et al. Smoking and drinking in relation to oral and pharyngeal cancer. Cancer Research 1988; 48(11):3282–3287

3 U.S. Dept. of Health and Human Services. The health conse­quences of smoking: A report of the Surgeon General. U.S. Dept. of Health and Human Services, CDC, National Center of Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health, 2004. Available at: “http://www.surgeongeneral.gov/library/smokingconsequences/”. Accessed June 29, 2010.

4 Tomar SL, Asma S. Smoking-attributable periodontitis in the United States: findings from NHANES III. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. . J Periodontol. 2000 May;71(5):743-51

5 “Longitudinal Study of the Association Between Smoking as a Periodontitis Risk and Salivary Biomarkers Related to Periodontitis.” M. Kibayashi. Journal of Periodontology. 2007, vol. 78, no. 5, pages 859–867.

6 Preventing Cavities, Gum Disease, Tooth Loss, and Oral Cancer – 2011 At A Glance. http://www.cdc.gov/chronicdisease/resources/publications/AAG/doh.htm. Accessed 2012.

7 Oral Cancer.” National Institutes of Health. July 2007. http://report.nih.gov/NIHfactsheets/ViewFactSheet.aspx?csid=106&key=O#O

8 “Oral Health Topics A-Z: Smoking (Tobacco) Cessation.” American Dental Association. http://www.ada.org/public/topics/smoking_tobacco_faq.asp. Accessed 2009.

9 “Quitting Smoking: Why to Quit and How to Get Help.” National Cancer Institute, August 17, 2007. www.cancer.gov/cancertopics/factsheet/Tobacco/cessation Accessed 2010.

10 “Guide to Quitting Smoking.” American Cancer Society, August 7, 2008. www.cancer.org/docroot/PED/content/PED_10_13X_Guide_for_Quitting_Smoking.asp Accessed 2008.

11 “Women and Smoking: Questions and Answers. ” National Cancer Institute, February 27, 2008. www.cancer.gov/cancertopics/factsheet/Tobacco/women Accessed 2010.

12  Rooban T, Vidya K, Joshua E, et.al. Tooth decay in alcohol and tobacco abusers. J Oral Maxillofac Pathol. 2011 Jan;15(1):14-21.

 

 

2 thoughts on “Resolve to Kick Butts in 2012

  1. It’s nearly impossible to find knowledgeable people for this topic,
    however, you sound like you know what you’re talking about!
    Thanks

  2. This is one subject we need to get a hand on. We need to make aware to patients how important it is to have oral cancer screening on a regular check up. We can only educate them so much about how important it is. It is up to the patient to follow through on being screened.

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