Top 10 Fright Night Facts

Did you know Americans consumed 24.7 pounds of candy per capita in 2010?1 That’s a lot of sugar to potentially cause cavities if left on the teeth of boys and ghouls too long. After eating candy, Delta Dental recommends a thorough brushing of teeth (or at least a big drink of water).

Since Halloween is a favorite holiday of many Americans, Delta Dental has compiled a list of the 10 best terrifically terrifying truths:

1. Americans purchase nearly 600 million pounds of candy for Halloween each year.2

2. Major pumpkin-producing states like California, Illinois, New York and Ohio helped America grow 1.1 billion pounds of pumpkins in 2010.3

3. Sixty percent of dentists polled for Delta Dental’s Tricky Treats survey said they give out candy on Halloween. Of the dentists who dispense candy, 79 percent choose chocolate, while just 13 percent hand out varieties like hard candy or lollipops. This confectionary choice is no accident. Chocolate dissolves quickly in the mouth and can be eaten easily, which decreases the amount of time sugar stays in contact with teeth.4

4. Americans spent nearly $6.9 billion on Halloween costumes, decorations and “entertainment”.2

5. About 50 percent of Americans decorated their homes or yards, 44 percent dressed in a costume, 34 percent attended a Halloween party and 23 percent visited a haunted house in 2011.2

6. In 2011, the three most popular costumes worn by children were Harry Potter, princess and Green Lantern. Classic characters like Winnie the Pooh, Elmo and the Smurfs were also among the top 10 favorites. Captain America, Green Lantern and Where’s Waldo were popular costume choices for adults.5

7. Nearly one out of four dentists said they do not hand out anything on Halloween, while five percent attack the holiday head on by handing out toothbrushes.4

8. Not everyone gives out candy on Halloween. Ideas include toothbrushes, pretzels, fruit (such as raisins), modeling clay and books.4

9. An estimated 41 million children between the ages of five and 14 went trick-or-treating across the U. S. in 2010.1

10. Candy corn, a popular treat commonly associated with Halloween, was created in the 1880s and popularized by farmers who appreciated its resemblance to kernels of corn. 6

To learn more about what dentists give out at Halloween and get their best advice for keeping kids’ teeth healthy, please visit http://www.trickytreats.org.

1 United State Census Bureau, 2010 Census. http://factfinder2.census.gov/faces/nav/jsf/pages/index.xhtml. Accessed August 2012.

2 National Retail Federation. Consumers Eager to Have a Frightfully Good Time This Halloween, According to NRF. http://www.nrf.com/modules.php?name=News&op=viewlive&sp_id=1197. Accessed August 2012.

3 USDA National Agricultural Statistics Service.
http://usda.mannlib.cornell.edu/usda/current/VegeSumm/VegeSumm-01-27-2011.pdf. Accessed August 2012.

4 Delta Dental conducted the 2011 Tricky Treats Halloween survey. Delta Dental network dentists were invited via e-mail to participate in the web-based survey. For results based on the total sample of 253, the margin of error is ±6.15 percentage points at a 95 percent confidence level.

5 Sortprice.com. Hollywood Blockbusters & Traditional Favorites Dominate SortPrice.com’s Annual Top 10 Halloween Costume Lists for 2011. http://www.sortprice.com/docs/Halloween-Popular-Costumes-for-2011. Accessed August 2012.

6 National Confectioners Association. Candy Corn. http://www.candyusa.com/FunStuff/CandyType.cfm?ItemNumber=1582. Accessed August 2012.

Top 4 Tips for Antibiotics Use

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) says that antibiotic resistance is one of the world’s most pressing public health problems. According to the CDC, an estimated 50 percent of antibiotic prescription use in hospitals is inappropriate or unnecessary.(1)

Other studies have found that dentists also may prescribe antibiotics unnecessarily.(2-3) During “Talk About Prescriptions Month,” Delta Dental advises people to be responsible about how they use antibiotics.

Antibiotics are powerful medicines that fight bacterial infections. They work by killing bacteria or preventing them from reproducing until the body’s immune system can fight off the rest of the infection. When prescribed and taken correctly, their value in helping cure or prevent the spread of disease is significant. Contrary to popular belief, antibiotics do not fight infections caused by viruses such as the common cold, flu and bronchitis.

Every time a person takes antibiotics, sensitive bacteria are killed, but resistant germs may be left to grow and multiply. These resistant germs can then be spread to others and over time, an antibiotic resistant strain of bacteria can become a community problem. Repeated and improper uses of antibiotics are primary causes of the increase in drug-resistant bacteria.

Dentists mainly prescribe antibiotics for the management of infections in and around the mouth, which are usually caused by bacteria. They are sometimes used after oral surgery as a preventive measure or to treat a toothache. Most common dental infections take the form of a toothache and require some type of treatment, like a filling, root canal therapy, or tooth extraction. Antibiotics cannot cure a toothache and are not always necessary after routine oral surgery.

Individuals who are taking antibiotics should keep a few things in mind:

Take the entire prescription: Even if your condition is improving and you feel cured, finish the prescription. If you stop too soon, some bacteria can survive and reinfect.

Only take antibiotics to treat a bacterial infection: People instinctively want to take medication to make them feel better, even if they just have the flu or common cold. Antibiotics only work on bacteria, however, and the common cold is usually a virus.

Don’t save the bottle for future reuse: Antibiotics degrade when they are stored for months at a time, rendering them ineffective. Check with your pharmacy for appropriate disposal of expired medications.

Don’t share your antibiotics with others: Antibiotics are prescribed for specific purposes. Your doctor will typically check for potential adverse interactions or drug allergies before prescribing.

1 “Antibiotics: Will they work when you really need them?” Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. http://www.cdc.gov/getsmart/campaign-materials/week/downloads/factsheet-Monday-GetSmart-week.pdf. Accessed September 2012.

2 Zadik Y and Levn L. Clinical Decision Making in Restorative Dentistry, Endodontics, and Antibiotic Prescription. Journal of Dental Education January 1, 2008 vol. 72 no. 1 81-86

3 Dar-Odeh NS, Abu-Hammad OA, et.al. Antibiotic prescribing practices by dentists: a review. Ther Clin Risk Manag. 2010; 6: 301–306.