Going Green with Delta Dental

DD_Logo_pms360_RGB_3inWhen you think of green and Delta Dental, you might think of the green that has long been a featured part of the logo. But on Earth Day, it’s worth pointing out that Delta Dental companies have taken steps to ensure their business initiatives are green as well.

Delta Dental companies are moving their network provider offices from paper claims to electronic submissions, which helps save paper and reimburses their dentists faster. They also encourage their subscribers to go paperless by signing up for electronic dental benefits statements. A few even provide incentives – such as guaranteeing patient eligibility – for the subscribers who choose to perish paper.

Member companies use blog posts and pins on social media sites like Pinterest to share ideas with their environmentally-conscious consumers about reusing old toothbrushes for garden stakes or as cleaning tools, or turning empty tubes of toothpaste into a pencil holder.

Of course, corporations ought to practice what they preach. One Delta Dental company saved almost $60,000 by eliminating disposable paper cups and retrofitting light fixtures at its headquarters as part of its “green program initiative.”1

Like a lot of corporations in the 21st century, Delta Dental is always searching for ways to improve business efficiency and sustainability. We feel that corporate social responsibility these days must include going green.

1  Environmental & Energy Management News. Delta Dental Racks Up Savings with Varied Environmental Efforts. http://www.environmentalleader.com/2009/11/12/delta-dental-racks-up-savings-with-varied-environmental-efforts/

Sip Sparingly for Your Oral Health

Binge drinking may be frequently celebrated in pop culture and joked about on social media, but during Alcohol Awareness Month, Delta Dental warns consumers that alcohol abuse can be extremely harmful to oral health.

April is also Oral Cancer Awareness Month, and heavy alcohol consumption is one of the major risk factors for oral cancer. It is estimated that in 2013 there will be more than 36,000 new cases of oral and oropharyngeal cancer diagnosed in the United States, and about 17 people will die from this disease every day.1 In addition, certain popular adult beverages – such as Long Island Ice Teas, piña coladas and energy drink-and-vodka concoctions – contain large amounts of sugar, which causes tooth decay, while others (like red wine) can stain teeth. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has found that other short-term risks of binge drinking include car crashes, violence (including child abuse), risk of HIV and other sexually transmitted diseases, and unintended pregnancy. Long-term risks include liver disease, cancer, stroke, heart disease, and other chronic diseases.

According to the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA), binge drinking means drinking to the point that one’s blood alcohol concentration (BAC) levels reach 0.08g/dL.2 For women, this usually occurs after about four drinks in two hours, and for men, after about five. By the CDC’s definition (four or more adult beverages in one sitting), more than one in eight women binge drink and twice as many men binge drink as women do.3

Not surprisingly, the age group with the most binge drinkers is 18-34 adults. However, this cultural problem extends beyond college kids and twentysomethings. According to the CDC, nearly a quarter of all adults in the U.S. (more than 38 million) binge drink about four times per month. Drinking to excess causes 80,000 deaths in the U.S. annually.3

Drinking, like most other things, is best done in moderation for both your oral and overall health. For example, drinking the occasional glass of red wine (which contain heart-healthy antioxidants like resveratrol) may be beneficial for lowering LDL cholesterol and helping prevent clogging of arteries.4

1 American Cancer Society. Oral Cavity and Oropharngeal Cancer.  Accessed March 2013. http://www.cancer.org/cancer/oralcavityandoropharyngealcancer/detailedguide/oral-cavity-and-oropharyngeal-cancer-key-statistics

2 National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIH). Moderate & Binge Drinking. http://www.niaaa.nih.gov/alcohol-health/overview-alcohol-consumption/moderate-binge-drinking. Accessed March 2013.

3 Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Binge Drinking. http://www.cdc.gov/vitalsigns/bingedrinking/. Accessed March 2013.

4 Wu JM, Hsieh TC.  Resveratrol: a cardioprotective substance. Ann N Y Acad Sci. 2011 Jan;1215:16-21. 

Don’t Bottle Up the Oral Health Benefits of Fluoridated Water

Nearly 60 percent  of caregivers say they are more likely to give children bottled water than tap water, potentially depriving kids of fluoride that is critical to good oral health. In addition, according to the 2013 Delta Dental Children’s Oral Health Survey,1 more than twice as many caregivers say bottled water is better for children’s oral health than tap water – an opinion at odds with evidence-based dentistry and more than six decades of public health experience.

Fluoride actually helps to repair (remineralize) tooth surfaces that are damaged by the acid produced by certain bacteria in the mouth, which prevents cavities from continuing to form.2 Since U.S. cities began adding fluoride to water supplies more than 65 years ago, tooth decay has decreased dramatically.3 This result led the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) to name water fluoridation “one of the 10 great public health achievements of the 20th century.”4

Unfortunately, only 17 percent of parents believe that tap water is better for their children’s oral health than bottled water.1 Some bottled waters do contain fluoride but usually not in the optimal amount.5  Fluoride in the water provides decay-preventive benefits for the teeth of both children and adults, which makes it the most cost-effective way for communities to improve overall oral health.

The key to fluoride’s protective benefit is by having a little fluoride on your teeth throughout the day. Brushing teeth with a fluoride toothpaste at least twice a day, drinking fluoridated water and limiting frequent between-meal snacking on sugary or starchy foods will help keep most children and adults tooth decay-free.

If children don’t drink fluoridated water, Delta Dental offers these ways to get more fluoride into their diet:

  • Fluoridated toothpastes, mouth rinses and/or professionally-applied gels or varnishes. These products can help strengthen teeth by hardening the outer enamel surface. With toothpaste and rinses children tend to swallow much of what they put in their mouth. So fluoride toothpaste use should start about age 2 and fluoride rinses probably not until about ages 6 or 7.
  • Dietary fluoride supplements, such as tablets, drops or lozenges, which are typically available only by prescription and are intended for children typically older than 6 months living in areas without fluoridated water in their community.
  • Bottled water that states on the label that it contains the right amount of fluoride.

As with other vitamins and minerals, it’s important to get enough, but not too much. When young children whose teeth are still developing under their gums (up to about age 9) get too much fluoride, their teeth may erupt with faint white lines or patches called dental fluorosis. The CDC has reported an increase in dental fluorosis over the past couple of decades. Inappropriate swallowing of toothpaste and children living in fluoridated areas that also receive fluoride supplements are believed to play a major role in this increase.

For advice on the proper amount of fluoride specifically recommended for your child, consult with your dentist. The recommendation will depend on your child’s age, how much fluoride naturally occurs in your local water and your child’s risk for tooth decay.