Little evidence to support benefits of oil pulling

If you follow health or celebrity news you’ve likely heard the buzz on the latest natural health craze to hit the internet: Oil Pulling.

As the name suggests, the practice involves using about a tablespoon of oil – typically sesame or coconut, preferably organic – as a mouthwash. The oil is swished and “pulled” through the mouth for upwards of 20 minutes per session before being spit out into the trash. This ancient Hindu Ayurvedic medicine remedy is said to have a laundry list of health benefits, among which are common dental health concerns: preventing tooth decay, gum disease and bad breath as well as whitening teeth.

While there are numerous articles with claims and personal stories supporting the practice of oil pulling, there is little scientific evidence to support these assertions. There is, however, significant evidence that a preventive oral care routine including brushing teeth for about two minutes twice daily with fluoride toothpaste, flossing daily and visiting a dentist regularly can prevent dental disease.

There is likely little harm in trying oil pulling, other than possible discomfort from the lengthy swishing process. If you do decide to try this or any other alternative medicine or natural remedy, we encourage you to consider it a complement to a proven preventive dental care routine. You may also want to check with your physician or dentist to make sure that alternative practices will not interfere with any medications or affect other problems that you may have.

Three reasons to smile during National Smile Month

Just in time for National Smile Month, we present three reasons to smile:

1. Smile for Beauty’s Sake: According to a survey of more than 1,000 Americans nationwide, a smile is the most important physical feature that contributes to a person’s overall attractiveness. Nearly one-half of Americans (47 percent) cited the smile as the most important physical feature, followed by eyes (27 percent) and physique (16 percent). Men and women agreed on the order, though women said they put more emphasis on a person’s eyes.

2. Smile for Success: More than six of 10 Americans (64 percent) say a smile has some bearing on a person’s overall success.

3. Smile with Satisfaction: More than six of 10 Americans (64 percent) say they like their smile, and almost a third (31 percent) wouldn’t change a thing about it. Those who would change their smile most frequently cited cosmetic improvements such as whitening or straightening of teeth.

So get out there and celebrate National Smile Month with a smile – for whatever reason you choose!

Morpace, Inc. conducted the Delta Dental Oral Health and Well-Being Survey on behalf of Delta Dental with 1,003 consumers across the United States.

Use the Tooth Fairy as a teaching tool

In 2013, the Tooth Fairy visited 86 percent of U.S. homes with children who lost a tooth. What kid doesn’t love a magical fairy that leaves goodies beneath their pillow? This built-in goodwill towards and interest in the Tooth Fairy opens the door for parents to use this little lady as a teaching tool when it comes to the importance of oral health.

In honor of National Tooth Fairy Day (February 28) here are a few suggestions for ways to use the Tooth Fairy to teach kids about good dental health habits:

  • Introduce the Tooth Fairy early on. Kids will start losing baby teeth around age 6. Before this age, parents can teach kids about the Tooth Fairy and let them know that good oral health habits and healthy teeth make her happy. Use this as an opportunity to brush up on a child’s everyday dental routine. Kids not wanting to brush and floss? Remind them that the Tooth Fairy is only looking for healthy baby teeth, not teeth with cavities. This will help get kids excited about taking care of their teeth.
  • Leave a note reinforcing good habits. A personalized note from the Tooth Fairy could be nearly as exciting for kids as the gift itself. Parents should include tips for important oral health habits that the Tooth Fairy wants kids to practice, such as brushing twice a day, flossing once a day and visiting the dentist twice a year. In fact, we’ve created some sample letters to get you started!
  • Give oral health gifts. Although the Tooth Fairy left cash for kids in 99 percent of homes she visited, a few children received toys, gum or other gifts. Consider forgoing cash and reinforce good oral health habits by providing a new toothbrush with their favorite cartoon character or fun-flavored toothpaste. How about a new book? There are several children’s books about Tooth Fairy adventures that can add to the Tooth Fairy excitement. Also gone are the days of worrying about not being able to find the tiny tooth under your child’s pillow in the middle of the night. Special Tooth Fairy pillows with tiny, tooth-sized pockets attached are now available in many themes and can even be customized with your child’s name. But if the family tradition has always included money, you don’t have to stop. Consider giving both cash and a new toothbrush to reinforce good oral health habits.

DDPA Tooth Fairy 2013 Poll Infographic web 2014For more information and ways to make your child’s Tooth Fairy experience extra special, visit www.theoriginaltoothfairypoll.com

How Many Dental X-Rays Do Your Kids Need?

Young Teen at DentistFebruary is National Children’s Dental Health Month, the perfect time to take your kids to the dentist for one of their regular visits. But before you do, Delta Dental encourages you to be well-informed about how often your child should have dental X-rays.

The purpose of X-rays is to allow dentists to see signs of disease or potential problems that are not visible to the naked eye. They are should be suggested after the dentist has done a clinical exam and considered any signs and symptoms, oral and medical history, diet, hygiene, fluoride use and other factors that might suggest a higher risk of hidden dental disease.

However, all X-rays use ionizing radiation that can potentially cause damage. Though it is spread out in tiny doses, the effect of radiation from years of X-rays is cumulative. The risks associated with this radiation are greater for children than for adults. So be sure that your dentist checks your child’s teeth, health history and risk factors before deciding an X-ray is necessary.

“X-rays are an important tool for dentists to diagnose dental diseases. However, they do not need to be part of every exam,” said Dr. Bill Kohn, DDS, Delta Dental Plans Association’s vice president of dental science and policy. “They should be ordered only after the dentist has examined the mouth and has determined that X-rays are needed to make a proper diagnosis. In general, children and adults at low risk for tooth decay and gum disease need X-rays less frequently.”

Ideally, your dentist should adhere to the guidelines established by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and the American Dental Association. The following chart, adapted from those guidelines, gives a basic timeline for recommended frequency of X-rays by age group. Keep in mind that multiple factors such as the child’s current oral health, future risk for disease, and developmental stage determine need, and some children will require more X-rays, and some fewer.

Ages

First visit

Routine recall visit

Routine recall visit

Active tooth decay or   history of cavities (Increased Risk)

No active tooth decay   or history of cavities (Low Risk)

Young children(ages 1 – 5),   with no permanent teeth Personalized exam which may consist of bitewing X-rays of back teeth (if no gaps exist between teeth that allow the dentist to examine the sides of teeth) and select individual X-rays, usually of front teeth. Bitewing X-rays every six to 12 months Bitewing X-rays every 12 to 24 months
Older children (ages 6 – 12), with some or all permanent teeth Personalized exam consisting of bitewing X-rays of back teeth and select individual X-rays, usually of front teeth; or a panoramic X-ray. Bitewing X-rays every six to 18 months Bitewing X-rays every 12 to 36 months
Adolescent, with permanent teeth but no wisdom teeth Personalized exam consisting of   bitewing X-rays of back teeth and select individual X-rays; or a panoramic X-ray; or a full mouth survey of X-rays if evidence of widespread oral disease. Bitewing X-rays every six to 18 months Bitewing X-rays every 12 to 36 months

Many people believe that if their dental plan pays for a certain number of X-rays, they should take advantage of that benefit. For most patients, however, this yearly X-ray exposure is excessive and unnecessary. Don’t let your insurance coverage dictate your decision. If you have questions or concerns related to dental X-rays, discuss them with your dentist.

 

Source: http://www.fda.gov/downloads/Radiation-EmittingProducts/RadiationEmittingProductsandProcedures/ MedicalImaging/MedicalX-Rays/UCM329746.pdf  (Accessed February 11, 2014).

Delta Dental Offers Alternative Approach to Resolutions

Failure to keep New Year’s resolutions is so commonplace these days that it has become an easy punch line for many derisive jokes. Studies have found only eight percent of people actually keep their resolutions annually. Conversely, one out of four people have never successfully kept a New Year’s resolution.

Maybe the problem is how you think of these resolutions, and simply changing your mindset might help. In 2014, take a cue from the 2007 movie The Bucket List, and put together a list of things that you must do before the year ends.

We at Delta Dental suggest you consider including some oral health-related items in your bucket list. Dr. Bill Kohn, DDS, DDPA’s vice president of dental science and policy, has a few time-honored suggestions:

  • Brush/floss regularly: Commit to brushing your teeth twice a day for two minutes at a time. Simple tools like egg timers or mobile apps can help you keep track of the time. If you never, ever floss, pledge to do so more frequently (starting with once a week and increasing to once a day).
  • Easy on the sweets: Limit your consumption of sugary snacks because the more times teeth are exposed to sugar, the longer acids have time to attack tooth enamel – and expedite tooth decay!
  • Kick butts: Cigarette smoking is the primary cause of severe gum disease in the U.S., so do yourself a favor and quit using tobacco products. Your teeth, gums and lungs will thank you.

Fill your bucket list with things that will make you happy and healthy, provide some adventure, and encourage personal growth. The length of your list doesn’t matter, but you should write it down and refer to it regularly throughout the year. Keep it simple and try to do at least one thing on your list each month.

An appointment with your dentist should be at the top of any healthy checklist. Like most things that we value and want to keep working properly, a regular dental check-up and some preventive maintenance goes a long way towards maintaining long-term, disease-free oral health.

Delta Dental sends you our best wishes for a happy, healthy and prosperous 2014!

Sealants Critical to Children’s Oral Health

Sealants are plastic coatings that protect those difficult to reach pits and grooves on the chewing surfaces of the teeth from the bacteria that cause tooth decay. A quick and painless procedure done in your dentist’s office, sealants are applied to the chewing surfaces of permanent molars as soon as possible after they fully erupt in the mouth, usually between the ages of six to eight for first molars and 10 to 12 for second molars. While sealants are not necessary for all children, they are particularly beneficial to children who are at higher risk for tooth decay. But, how do you know if your child is at higher risk?Although overall oral health risk is a combination of genetics, personal habits and diet, history of decay is a good predictor for future risk of decay. Your child is considered to be at higher risk if he or she has had a cavity filled in the past three years. The good news is you may be able to help prevent future cavities by making sure your child receives preventive care, including having sealants applied to first and second molars.

Although approximately 60 to 70 percent of cavities can be prevented by placing
sealants on children’s teeth, a recent study by Delta Dental shows that 60 percent of
children age 6 to 9 who are at higher risk of tooth decay did not receive sealants on
their first molars, and 80 percent of children age 11 to 15 did not receive sealants on
their second molars.1

Sealants Graphic

These figures are particularly striking when you realize that many dental plans cover preventive care, like sealants, at as much at 100 percent of the cost. As a parent, you want your child to be as healthy as possible, and that includes protecting their teeth. Delta Dental is here to help. Our myDentalScore risk assessment tool helps you better assess your child’s risk for oral disease by providing an easy to understand oral health scores report that you can use to consult with your dentist to determine the best treatment patterns for your child’s oral health needs. We also encourage you to take a look at your dental plan and make sure you are using preventive treatments to their full advantage – most are simple, painless and inexpensive. They can save your child from future pain and discomfort that often accompany cavities, and save you from paying for expensive fillings, crowns, or root canals.

To learn more about keeping all of the mouths in your life healthy, and to access the myDentalScore risk assessment tool, visit Delta Dental’s Oral Health Library at oralhealth.deltadental.com.

Five Holiday Treats that May Lead to Ho-Ho-Holes in Your Teeth

The old adage “too much of a good thing” is never more true than during the holiday season. There tends to be an overabundance of everything – especially sweet treats. While it’s impractical to suggest complete avoidance of holiday goodies, Delta Dental encourages moderation to make sure you receive the gift of great oral health!

Here are five common treats to limit during the holidays:

1.      Candy Canes: The problem with candy canes is the prolonged amount of time that they linger as you slowly dissolve them in your mouth. Not to mention, the temptation to chomp them, which can lead to cracks or chips in your teeth. Consume them quickly and carefully to limit their negative oral health impact.

gI_91743_iStock_000007980534Medium

2.      Christmas Cookies: It’s tempting to overindulge when there’s an abundance of baked goods – like Christmas cookies – laying around. But cookies are laden with sugar and can do significant damage to your pearly whites. Of course, we know suggesting skipping cookies entirely is impractical. Just enjoy them in moderation.

3.      Holiday Drinks (such as eggnog, apple cider and hot chocolate): Festive beverages offer more than warm, holiday cheer – eggnog boasts over 20 grams of sugar per cup,1 while hot cider can pack over 65 grams of sugar when dolled up with caramel sauce and whipped cream.2 Stick to one small serving of your favorite drink and wash away some of the sticky sugar residue with a glass of water.

4.      Caramels: Chewy, sticky treats such as grandma’s famous homemade caramels are particularly damaging because they are not only high in sugar, but they spend a prolonged amount of time stuck to teeth and are more difficult for saliva to break down. The same rule applies to all those sparkly gumdrops on your gingerbread house.

5.      Fruitcake: Even though it’s the butt of many holiday jokes, some people actually eat the fruitcake that gets passed around at the holidays. Oral health reasons to avoid it include the sugary cake base and the chewy, candied fruit that stud it throughout.

Cookies, candy and sweet holiday beverages all have at least one main ingredient in common: sugar, whose negative effect on teeth has been well-documented. Why is sugar so bad for your teeth? It mixes with bacteria in the sticky plaque that constantly forms on teeth to produce acid that attacks tooth enamel. The stickiness of that plaque keeps those harmful acids against the teeth, which contributes to tooth decay.

“No one wants to be the Grinch about enjoying all the special experiences of the holidays, particularly the tasty treats that are usually around,” said Dr. Bill Kohn, DDS, Delta Dental Plans Association’s vice president for dental science and policy. “Try to enjoy in moderation, and if you find yourself overindulging, perhaps spend some extra time flossing and brushing at least twice a day with a fluoride toothpaste.”

When you do indulge your holiday sweet tooth, it’s best to enjoy goodies as part of, or immediately following a meal, rather than snacking on treats throughout the day. Another good tip to is to stick to one small serving of your favorite drink or snack and to follow up by swishing around some water, chew sugar-free gum, or brush soon after finishing to wash away some of the sticky sugar residue.

1USDA. Basic Food Report: Eggnog. http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/dairy-and-egg-products/55/2

2MyFitnessPal. http://www.myfitnesspal.com/food/calories/starbucks-grande-caramel-apple-spice-cider-with-whip-61966862

Certain Kids Could Benefit From More Fluoride

Fluoride is a mineral that helps teeth become more resistant to decay (cavities). You can help prevent your child from getting cavities by making sure they drink fluoridated water and brush at least twice daily with fluoride toothpaste. For many children, this daily fluoride exposure is enough to protect them for a lifetime.

But, has your child had a cavity in the past three years? If you answered yes, he or she is likely at higher-risk for tooth decay in the future. If your child is at higher risk for future tooth decay, you should also talk to your dentist about prescription-strength fluoride that can be applied in their office two or more times per year. Unfortunately, many higher-risk children are not receiving this protective treatment.

Although 2.5 million of the children Delta Dental covers are considered to be at higher-risk for cavities, 70 percent of them did not receive the recommended two or more fluoride treatments per year.1 The great news is that many of Delta Dental’s benefits plans cover preventive care, like two fluoride treatments per year, at 100 percent.

Take a look at your plan and make sure you are using preventive treatments to their full advantage – most are simple, painless and inexpensive. They can save your child from future pain and discomfort that often accompany tooth decay, and save you from paying for expensive fillings, crowns, or root canals. Delta Dental knows that you are doing your best to keep your family healthy, and that’s why we want to help you assess your child’s risk for oral disease and give you the information you need to help take steps to prevent or treat them. Delta

Dental’s myDentalScore risk assessment tool provides you with leading edge technology to evaluate your family’s oral health. By taking just three minutes to answer a few simple questions, you will receive an easy to understand oral health scores report that tells you exactly where your child stands for risk of oral diseases. Once you have the report, consult with your dentist to determine the best treatment patterns for your child’s oral health needs.

For answers to all of your oral health questions and to access the myDentalScore risk assessment tool, visit Delta Dental’s oral health education website at oralhealth.deltadental.com.1

1The Preventive Dental Care Study is a landmark claims study of Delta Dental’s more than 90 million dental claims that investigated whether higher-risk children and adults were receiving the preventive care they needed. For more information on the study, visit deltadental.com/pdcstudy.

The Silent Signs of Gum Disease

Diabetes is a pervasive problem in America, a cultural epidemic with wide-ranging and potentially severe consequences. According to the 2011 National Diabetes Factsheet, 25.8 million people or 8.3 percent of the U.S. population has diabetes at an estimated annual total cost of about $245 billion. 1

November is National Diabetes Month and Delta Dental wants to remind people of the well-documented connection between diabetes and oral health. 2 People with diabetes tend to develop periodontal (gum) disease earlier in life, and more severely. Though it is often painless, Delta Dental cautions people suffering from diabetes to be mindful of its warning signs. These can include bad breath, bleeding gums after brushing or flossing, red, swollen or tender gums, or changes in the way your teeth fit when you bite. Unfortunately, many people ignore those periodontal red flags until it’s too late.3

Individuals often ignore the warning signs of periodontal disease because there is usually no pain involved. So they will brush a little better to get rid of the bleeding or use mouthwash to hide their bad breath. The best idea is to schedule regular visits to your dentist to make sure that you are not developing periodontal disease.

Maintaining regular dental visits is particularly critical for patients suffering from diabetes.Oral diseases such as tooth decay and gum disease are often reversible if they are diagnosed and treated early. Dentists can also check for other common mouth conditions that afflict people with diabetes such as dry mouth, ulcers and infections. Periodontal disease and other mouth conditions may also be a sign that other medical conditions exist elsewhere in the body. Depending on their findings, the dentist might advise patients to seek a medical consultation.

Even before visiting the dentist, patients can use an online risk assessment tool (such as Delta Dental’s myDentalScore) to answer a series of questions that can gauge their risk levels for gum disease, oral cancer and other serious oral health problems. Additional lifestyle best practices for people with diabetes include controlling blood sugar, brushing and flossing daily, and quitting smoking.

1 Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. National Diabetes Fact Sheet, 2011. http://www.cdc.gov/diabetes/pubs/pdf/ndfs_2011.pdf.

2 National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research. Diabetes and Oral Health. http://www.nidcr.nih.gov/OralHealth/Topics/Diabetes/default.htm

3American Diabetes Association. 2013  Diabetes Facts.   http://www.diabetes.org/diabetes-basics/diabetes-statistics/

The Best and Worst Halloween Treats for Teeth

Little ghosts and goblins will trick-or-treat to collect as much candy as they can this Halloween, but it’s not just kids who will enjoy the treats. Nearly 80 percent of parents admit they eat their children’s Halloween candy, according to the Delta Dental Children’s Oral Health Survey.1 But some candies have the potential to do more damage to teeth than others.

The best way to protect teeth from decay is to have candy in small portions at limited times, such as after a meal, as dessert or at regular snack times. Nearly 90 percent of parents say their kids consume Halloween candy this way.Choose candy that melts and disappears quickly. The longer teeth are exposed to sugar, the longer bacteria can feed on it, which could produce cavity-causing acid.

While no sweets are good for teeth, some are less harmful than others. We rated the best and worst treats for teeth on a scale of 1 to 5, with 1 being least harmful.

  1. Sugar-free candy and gum with xylitol                                                                   Sugar-free foods don’t contain sugar that can feed on the bacteria in the mouth and produce decay-causing acids. Gum and candy with xylitol may actually protect teeth by reducing the acids produced by bacteria and increasing saliva to rinse away excess sugars and acids.
  • Our survey says 44 percent of kids eat sugar-free candy at Halloween.1
  1. Powdery candy (such as sugar straws)                                                                     Sure, powdery candy is packed with pure sugar. But powdery candy dissolves quickly and doesn’t stick to the teeth.
  1. Chocolate (such as candy bars)                                                                             Chocolate dissolves quickly in the mouth and can be eaten easily, which decreases the amount of time sugar stays in contact with teeth. And calcium could help protect tooth enamel. However, chocolate with fillings, such as caramel and nuts, is a lot more harmful for teeth than the plain variety.
  • Our survey says 86 percent of kids eat chocolate at Halloween. 1
  1. Hard candy (such as lollipops or mints)                                                                     Hard candy is tough on teeth because it tends to be sucked on at a leisurely pace for an extended period of time. Plus, chomping down on hard candy can chip or break teeth.
  • Our survey says 50 percent of kids eat hard candy at Halloween. 1
  1. Chewy candy (such as caramels or gummies)                                                         Chewy, sticky treats are particularly damaging because they are high in sugar, spend a prolonged amount of time stuck to teeth and are more difficult for saliva to break down.
  • Our survey says 57 percent of kids eat chewy candy at Halloween. 1

Another way to protect teeth is to give kids something other than candy.  Nearly 25 percent of parents hand out non-candy items to trick-or-treaters, such as toys, money or fruit.1

For additional tips on how to help keep children’s teeth healthy during Halloween and all year long, visit the Tooth Fairy’s Halloween website at www.toothfairytrickytreats.com.

1 Morpace Inc. conducted the 2013 Delta Dental Children’s Oral Health Survey. Interviews were conducted nationally via the Internet with 926 primary caregivers of children from birth to age 11. For results based on the total sample of national adults, the margin of error is ±3.2 percentage points at a 95 percent confidence level.