Three reasons to smile during National Smile Month

Just in time for National Smile Month, we present three reasons to smile:

1. Smile for Beauty’s Sake: According to a survey of more than 1,000 Americans nationwide, a smile is the most important physical feature that contributes to a person’s overall attractiveness. Nearly one-half of Americans (47 percent) cited the smile as the most important physical feature, followed by eyes (27 percent) and physique (16 percent). Men and women agreed on the order, though women said they put more emphasis on a person’s eyes.

2. Smile for Success: More than six of 10 Americans (64 percent) say a smile has some bearing on a person’s overall success.

3. Smile with Satisfaction: More than six of 10 Americans (64 percent) say they like their smile, and almost a third (31 percent) wouldn’t change a thing about it. Those who would change their smile most frequently cited cosmetic improvements such as whitening or straightening of teeth.

So get out there and celebrate National Smile Month with a smile – for whatever reason you choose!

Morpace, Inc. conducted the Delta Dental Oral Health and Well-Being Survey on behalf of Delta Dental with 1,003 consumers across the United States.

Delta Dental Offers Alternative Approach to Resolutions

Failure to keep New Year’s resolutions is so commonplace these days that it has become an easy punch line for many derisive jokes. Studies have found only eight percent of people actually keep their resolutions annually. Conversely, one out of four people have never successfully kept a New Year’s resolution.

Maybe the problem is how you think of these resolutions, and simply changing your mindset might help. In 2014, take a cue from the 2007 movie The Bucket List, and put together a list of things that you must do before the year ends.

We at Delta Dental suggest you consider including some oral health-related items in your bucket list. Dr. Bill Kohn, DDS, DDPA’s vice president of dental science and policy, has a few time-honored suggestions:

  • Brush/floss regularly: Commit to brushing your teeth twice a day for two minutes at a time. Simple tools like egg timers or mobile apps can help you keep track of the time. If you never, ever floss, pledge to do so more frequently (starting with once a week and increasing to once a day).
  • Easy on the sweets: Limit your consumption of sugary snacks because the more times teeth are exposed to sugar, the longer acids have time to attack tooth enamel – and expedite tooth decay!
  • Kick butts: Cigarette smoking is the primary cause of severe gum disease in the U.S., so do yourself a favor and quit using tobacco products. Your teeth, gums and lungs will thank you.

Fill your bucket list with things that will make you happy and healthy, provide some adventure, and encourage personal growth. The length of your list doesn’t matter, but you should write it down and refer to it regularly throughout the year. Keep it simple and try to do at least one thing on your list each month.

An appointment with your dentist should be at the top of any healthy checklist. Like most things that we value and want to keep working properly, a regular dental check-up and some preventive maintenance goes a long way towards maintaining long-term, disease-free oral health.

Delta Dental sends you our best wishes for a happy, healthy and prosperous 2014!

Certain Kids Could Benefit From More Fluoride

Fluoride is a mineral that helps teeth become more resistant to decay (cavities). You can help prevent your child from getting cavities by making sure they drink fluoridated water and brush at least twice daily with fluoride toothpaste. For many children, this daily fluoride exposure is enough to protect them for a lifetime.

But, has your child had a cavity in the past three years? If you answered yes, he or she is likely at higher-risk for tooth decay in the future. If your child is at higher risk for future tooth decay, you should also talk to your dentist about prescription-strength fluoride that can be applied in their office two or more times per year. Unfortunately, many higher-risk children are not receiving this protective treatment.

Although 2.5 million of the children Delta Dental covers are considered to be at higher-risk for cavities, 70 percent of them did not receive the recommended two or more fluoride treatments per year.1 The great news is that many of Delta Dental’s benefits plans cover preventive care, like two fluoride treatments per year, at 100 percent.

Take a look at your plan and make sure you are using preventive treatments to their full advantage – most are simple, painless and inexpensive. They can save your child from future pain and discomfort that often accompany tooth decay, and save you from paying for expensive fillings, crowns, or root canals. Delta Dental knows that you are doing your best to keep your family healthy, and that’s why we want to help you assess your child’s risk for oral disease and give you the information you need to help take steps to prevent or treat them. Delta

Dental’s myDentalScore risk assessment tool provides you with leading edge technology to evaluate your family’s oral health. By taking just three minutes to answer a few simple questions, you will receive an easy to understand oral health scores report that tells you exactly where your child stands for risk of oral diseases. Once you have the report, consult with your dentist to determine the best treatment patterns for your child’s oral health needs.

For answers to all of your oral health questions and to access the myDentalScore risk assessment tool, visit Delta Dental’s oral health education website at oralhealth.deltadental.com.1

1The Preventive Dental Care Study is a landmark claims study of Delta Dental’s more than 90 million dental claims that investigated whether higher-risk children and adults were receiving the preventive care they needed. For more information on the study, visit deltadental.com/pdcstudy.

The Silent Signs of Gum Disease

Diabetes is a pervasive problem in America, a cultural epidemic with wide-ranging and potentially severe consequences. According to the 2011 National Diabetes Factsheet, 25.8 million people or 8.3 percent of the U.S. population has diabetes at an estimated annual total cost of about $245 billion. 1

November is National Diabetes Month and Delta Dental wants to remind people of the well-documented connection between diabetes and oral health. 2 People with diabetes tend to develop periodontal (gum) disease earlier in life, and more severely. Though it is often painless, Delta Dental cautions people suffering from diabetes to be mindful of its warning signs. These can include bad breath, bleeding gums after brushing or flossing, red, swollen or tender gums, or changes in the way your teeth fit when you bite. Unfortunately, many people ignore those periodontal red flags until it’s too late.3

Individuals often ignore the warning signs of periodontal disease because there is usually no pain involved. So they will brush a little better to get rid of the bleeding or use mouthwash to hide their bad breath. The best idea is to schedule regular visits to your dentist to make sure that you are not developing periodontal disease.

Maintaining regular dental visits is particularly critical for patients suffering from diabetes.Oral diseases such as tooth decay and gum disease are often reversible if they are diagnosed and treated early. Dentists can also check for other common mouth conditions that afflict people with diabetes such as dry mouth, ulcers and infections. Periodontal disease and other mouth conditions may also be a sign that other medical conditions exist elsewhere in the body. Depending on their findings, the dentist might advise patients to seek a medical consultation.

Even before visiting the dentist, patients can use an online risk assessment tool (such as Delta Dental’s myDentalScore) to answer a series of questions that can gauge their risk levels for gum disease, oral cancer and other serious oral health problems. Additional lifestyle best practices for people with diabetes include controlling blood sugar, brushing and flossing daily, and quitting smoking.

1 Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. National Diabetes Fact Sheet, 2011. http://www.cdc.gov/diabetes/pubs/pdf/ndfs_2011.pdf.

2 National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research. Diabetes and Oral Health. http://www.nidcr.nih.gov/OralHealth/Topics/Diabetes/default.htm

3American Diabetes Association. 2013  Diabetes Facts.   http://www.diabetes.org/diabetes-basics/diabetes-statistics/

Kids Need to Brush Longer and More Often

Poor and infrequent brushing may be major obstacles keeping children from having excellent oral health and are the areas that cause caregivers the greatest concern.

A survey1 of American children’s oral health found that while nearly two out of five Americans (37 percent) report that their child’s overall oral health is excellent, more than a third of the survey respondents (35 percent) admit their child brushes his or her teeth less than twice a day. Parents and caregivers recognize the frequency as “not enough,” despite the fact that nearly all of those surveyed (96 percent) with children up to age 6 say they supervise or assist with brushing.

Among those who rate their child’s oral health as less than excellent, only 56 percent say their child brushes his or her teeth for at least two minutes, which is the amount of time dentists typically recommend spending on each brushing.

Getting children to brush regularly, and correctly, can be a real challenge. Here are some easy ideas to encourage brushing:

  • Trade places: Tired of prying your way in whenever it’s time to brush those little teeth? Why not reverse roles and let the child brush your teeth? It’s fun for them and shows them the right way to brush. Just remember, do not share a toothbrush. According to the American Dental Association, sharing a toothbrush may result in an exchange of microorganisms and an increased risk of infections.
  • Take turns: Set a timer and have the child brush his or her teeth for 30 seconds. Then you brush their teeth for 30 seconds. Repeat this at least twice.
  • Call in reinforcements: If children stubbornly neglect to brush or floss, maybe it’s time to change the messenger. Call the dental office before the next checkup and let them know what’s going on. The same motivational message might be heeded if it comes from a third party, especially the dentist.

1 Morpace Inc. conducted the 2011 Delta Dental Children’s Oral Health Survey. Interviews were conducted by email nationally with 907 primary caregivers of children from birth to age 11. For results based on the total sample of national adults, the margin of error is ±3.25 percentage points at a 95 percent confidence level.


Don’t Let Meds Desert Older Adults

Novelist C. S. Lewis once wrote, “How incessant and great are the ills with which a prolonged old age is replete.” Indeed, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reports that about four out of every five older adults suffer from a chronic condition, and half have at least two.1

Often, those chronic conditions are treated with a variety of prescription medications. During National Healthy Aging Month, Delta Dental, the nation’s largest dental benefits provider, cautions older adults to guard against a dangerous side effect of more than 400 prescribed and over-the-counter medications – dry mouth.2

As it is medically defined, dry mouth is the result of a reduction of salivary output or quality. But dry mouth is more than just irritating and mildly uncomfortable; it can also increase the risk of tooth decay, gum disease and other oral infections. Many medications that treat chronic illnesses – such as hay fever, heart disease, Parkinson’s disease, high blood pressure (hypertension) and depression – are known to have dry mouth as a side effect.3

The New York Times recently attributed the dry mouth that results from many prescription medications as a major contributor to the rapidly deteriorating oral health of nursing home residents.4 The American Dental Association (ADA) has even advocated for warning-label information on these types of “xerogenic” medications to promote awareness of the potential oral health complications associated with drug-induced dry mouth.3 According to the ADA, chronic dry mouth is a common adverse effect for each of the following medication groups:3

  • Cardiovascular medications (such as diuretics or calcium channel blockers)
  • Anticholinergic agents for treatment of urinary incontinence (e.g., oxybutynin and tolterodine)
  • Tricyclic antidepressants (e.g., amitriptyline)
  • Anti-psychotic agents (e.g., chlorpromazine)
  • Anti-Parkinson’s medications (e.g., benzatropine)
  • Anti-allergy medications (e.g., antihistamines)

If your mouth becomes dry after taking a medication, you may want to mention it to your physician. Sometimes, an equally effective substitute medication can be prescribed that does not have the same side effect. To help you maintain good oral health and stimulate saliva, your dentist might suggest sipping water or sucking on ice chips frequently, avoiding alcohol, caffeine and tobacco products, chewing sugar-free gum or sucking on sugar-free candies.

1 Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Healthy Aging at a Glance (2011). Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.  http://www.cdc.gov/chronicdisease/resources/publications/AAG/aging.htm

 2 U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Oral Health in America: A Report of the Surgeon General. Rockville, MD: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, National Institutes of Health, 2000.

3 Warning Label Information on Medications Associated with Xerostomia (Dry Mouth). American Dental Association. http://www.ada.org/sections/newsAndEvents/pdfs/ltr_dry_mouth_110427.pdf

4 Nursing Homes’ Dental Problems. New York Times. http://www.nytimes.com/video/2013/08/05/health/100000002374631/nursing-homes-dental-problems.html?smid=tw-share

“Dry Mouth.” National Institute on Aging, National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, National Institutes of Health, March 20, 2010. http://www.nidcr.nih.gov/OralHealth/Topics/DryMouth Accessed 2010.

Ignorance Not Blissful for Your Children’s Oral Health

“What you don’t know won’t hurt you” is a popular idiom that couldn’t be further from the truth when it comes to personal health. In fact, parents’ lack of knowledge about certain common at-home habits could jeopardize their children’s oral health.

For instance, nearly half of American children under age 3 have never seen the dentist, according to the 2013 Delta Dental Children’s Oral Health Survey.1 What many parents don’t realize is the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry recommends that a child go to the dentist by age 1 or within six months after their first tooth erupts.2

Parents should take children to the dentist by age 1 to establish a trusting relationship with the dentist and receive critical oral health care advice. Studies show that early preventive dental care can save in future dental treatment costs.

Fill bottles with water, not juice or milk
Nearly 50 percent of caregivers with a child 4 years old or younger report that the child sometimes takes a nap or goes to bed with a bottle or sippy cup containing milk or juice. This bad habit can lead to early childhood (baby bottle) tooth decay.

Ideally, children should finish a bottle before they are put down to sleep. But if they must have something to comfort them while they go to sleep, fill a bottle with water. Don’t get in the habit of providing sweet drinks because you think it will please your child.  Of course, most children do like sweets, but babies and toddlers want the soothing, repetitive action of sucking on a bottle more than sweetened drinks.

Avoid sharing food and utensils with children
Did you know that caregivers can actually pass harmful bacteria from their mouth to a child’s mouth, which can put the child at an increased risk for cavities? Bacteria are passed when items contaminated with saliva go into a child’s mouth. Typically, this takes place through natural, parental behaviors, such as sharing eating utensils or cleaning off your baby’s pacifier with your mouth. Parents with a history of poor oral health are particularly likely to pass germs along.

However, three out of every four caregivers say they share utensils such as a spoon, fork or glass with a child. Caregivers of children ages 2 to 3 are most likely to share utensils with their children.

For additional tips to help keep children’s teeth healthy during National Smile Month and all year long, visit www.oralhealth.deltadental.com.

Morpace Inc. conducted the 2013 Delta Dental Children’s Oral Health Survey. Interviews were conducted nationally via the Internet with 926 primary caregivers of children from birth to age 11. For results based on the total sample of national adults, the margin of error is ±3.2 percentage points at a 95 percent confidence level.

2 American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry – Policy on the Dental Home. http://www.aapd.org/media/Policies_Guidelines/P_DentalHome.pdf