Sip Sparingly for Your Oral Health

Binge drinking may be frequently celebrated in pop culture and joked about on social media, but during Alcohol Awareness Month, Delta Dental warns consumers that alcohol abuse can be extremely harmful to oral health.

April is also Oral Cancer Awareness Month, and heavy alcohol consumption is one of the major risk factors for oral cancer. It is estimated that in 2013 there will be more than 36,000 new cases of oral and oropharyngeal cancer diagnosed in the United States, and about 17 people will die from this disease every day.1 In addition, certain popular adult beverages – such as Long Island Ice Teas, piña coladas and energy drink-and-vodka concoctions – contain large amounts of sugar, which causes tooth decay, while others (like red wine) can stain teeth. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has found that other short-term risks of binge drinking include car crashes, violence (including child abuse), risk of HIV and other sexually transmitted diseases, and unintended pregnancy. Long-term risks include liver disease, cancer, stroke, heart disease, and other chronic diseases.

According to the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA), binge drinking means drinking to the point that one’s blood alcohol concentration (BAC) levels reach 0.08g/dL.2 For women, this usually occurs after about four drinks in two hours, and for men, after about five. By the CDC’s definition (four or more adult beverages in one sitting), more than one in eight women binge drink and twice as many men binge drink as women do.3

Not surprisingly, the age group with the most binge drinkers is 18-34 adults. However, this cultural problem extends beyond college kids and twentysomethings. According to the CDC, nearly a quarter of all adults in the U.S. (more than 38 million) binge drink about four times per month. Drinking to excess causes 80,000 deaths in the U.S. annually.3

Drinking, like most other things, is best done in moderation for both your oral and overall health. For example, drinking the occasional glass of red wine (which contain heart-healthy antioxidants like resveratrol) may be beneficial for lowering LDL cholesterol and helping prevent clogging of arteries.4

1 American Cancer Society. Oral Cavity and Oropharngeal Cancer.  Accessed March 2013. http://www.cancer.org/cancer/oralcavityandoropharyngealcancer/detailedguide/oral-cavity-and-oropharyngeal-cancer-key-statistics

2 National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIH). Moderate & Binge Drinking. http://www.niaaa.nih.gov/alcohol-health/overview-alcohol-consumption/moderate-binge-drinking. Accessed March 2013.

3 Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Binge Drinking. http://www.cdc.gov/vitalsigns/bingedrinking/. Accessed March 2013.

4 Wu JM, Hsieh TC.  Resveratrol: a cardioprotective substance. Ann N Y Acad Sci. 2011 Jan;1215:16-21. 

How Does Your Smile Score?

In the past, almost everyone developed tooth decay, and as people aged, tooth loss from decay and gum disease was routine. Today, thanks to scientific advances and preventive therapies like community water fluoridation, fluoride toothpaste and dental sealants, there has been dramatic and continuing improvement in the oral health of Americans. Many people still suffer from oral disease problems, however, and risk for oral disease varies among all people.

The good news is that if you know your specific risk factors for tooth decay, gum disease and oral cancer, you can take simple preventive action to avoid these problems. That’s why Delta Dental, the nation’s largest dental benefits company, is helping people assess their risk for diseases and take steps to prevent or treat them.

Through a partnership with a leading risk and disease analytic software designer, PreViser Corp., Delta Dental has launched myDentalScore, a risk assessment tool that provides leading edge technology to evaluate your oral health. By taking just a few minutes to answer some simple questions online, you will receive an easy to understand oral health scores report that estimates your risk of tooth decay, gum disease and oral cancer. Once you have your score in hand, you can use myDentalScore to get valuable oral health advice and print out your report to bring to your next dental examination.

myDentalScore

Click on the above photo to visit mydentalscore.com/deltadental and access our quick, user-friendly survey. The survey asks a series of questions about your personal habits, past history of dental disease and treatment, and current symptoms of oral disease to assess your risk level for tooth decay, gum disease and oral cancer. After taking the risk assessment survey, you’ll receive a risk score for each problem area. You can bring this report to your dentist to verify your risk levels and, if needed, develop strategies to lower your risk for oral disease and improve your oral health. No personal health information (PHI) is ever revealed, and the survey can be taken anonymously. You can also visit oralhealth.deltadental.com for more oral health information. Find out your smile scores today, and take steps to protect it for a lifetime!

Don’t Beware the Dentist’s Chair

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimates that 26 million Americans suffer from diabetes. Even more troubling, another 57 million – about a fourth of U.S. adults – have pre-diabetes, which means their blood sugar levels are higher than normal, but not yet high enough to be classified as diabetes. Delta Dental is reminding Americans during “National Diabetes Month” that regular dental visits are crucial for people with diabetes.

According to the American Diabetes Association, controlling blood sugar levels is a key to preventing many serious complications of diabetes such as heart disease, kidney disease and stroke. Research also suggests a two-way relationship between serious periodontal (gum) disease and diabetes. Not only are people with diabetes more susceptible to severe gum disease, but it may have the potential to affect blood glucose control and contribute to the progression of diabetes.1 People with diabetes tend to develop periodontal disease earlier in life, and more severely. Instead of losing their teeth from gum disease in their 60s, they might begin losing teeth in their mid-40s. Smokers with diabetes are especially at-risk for gum disease and tooth loss.

Unfortunately, studies have found that people with diabetes see their dentist less often than those without the disease.2 Dentist visits are crucial because oral diseases such as tooth decay and gum disease are often reversible if they are diagnosed early and preventive treatments are delivered. Dentists will also check for other common mouth conditions that afflict people with diabetes such as dry mouth, ulcers and infections. Mouth conditions may also be a sign that other medical conditions exist elsewhere in the body. Depending on their findings, the dentist might advise patients to seek medical attention.

Daily brushing and flossing, regular dental check-ups and good blood glucose control are the best defenses against periodontal disease. In addition, quitting smoking may be the most important thing that people can do to protect their oral and overall health. The good news is that with proper dental hygiene at home and regular visits to the dentist (at least twice annually), there’s no reason people with diabetes should have worse oral health than people without.

1 American Diabetes Association. News and Research. http://www.diabetes.org/living-with-diabetes/treatment-and-care/oral-health-and-hygiene/oral-health-faqs.html Accessed October 2012.

2 Macek MD, Tomar SL. Dental care visits among dentate adults with diabetes and periodontitis. J Public Health Dent. 2009 Fall;69(4):284-9.

Top 4 Tips for Antibiotics Use

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) says that antibiotic resistance is one of the world’s most pressing public health problems. According to the CDC, an estimated 50 percent of antibiotic prescription use in hospitals is inappropriate or unnecessary.(1)

Other studies have found that dentists also may prescribe antibiotics unnecessarily.(2-3) During “Talk About Prescriptions Month,” Delta Dental advises people to be responsible about how they use antibiotics.

Antibiotics are powerful medicines that fight bacterial infections. They work by killing bacteria or preventing them from reproducing until the body’s immune system can fight off the rest of the infection. When prescribed and taken correctly, their value in helping cure or prevent the spread of disease is significant. Contrary to popular belief, antibiotics do not fight infections caused by viruses such as the common cold, flu and bronchitis.

Every time a person takes antibiotics, sensitive bacteria are killed, but resistant germs may be left to grow and multiply. These resistant germs can then be spread to others and over time, an antibiotic resistant strain of bacteria can become a community problem. Repeated and improper uses of antibiotics are primary causes of the increase in drug-resistant bacteria.

Dentists mainly prescribe antibiotics for the management of infections in and around the mouth, which are usually caused by bacteria. They are sometimes used after oral surgery as a preventive measure or to treat a toothache. Most common dental infections take the form of a toothache and require some type of treatment, like a filling, root canal therapy, or tooth extraction. Antibiotics cannot cure a toothache and are not always necessary after routine oral surgery.

Individuals who are taking antibiotics should keep a few things in mind:

Take the entire prescription: Even if your condition is improving and you feel cured, finish the prescription. If you stop too soon, some bacteria can survive and reinfect.

Only take antibiotics to treat a bacterial infection: People instinctively want to take medication to make them feel better, even if they just have the flu or common cold. Antibiotics only work on bacteria, however, and the common cold is usually a virus.

Don’t save the bottle for future reuse: Antibiotics degrade when they are stored for months at a time, rendering them ineffective. Check with your pharmacy for appropriate disposal of expired medications.

Don’t share your antibiotics with others: Antibiotics are prescribed for specific purposes. Your doctor will typically check for potential adverse interactions or drug allergies before prescribing.

1 “Antibiotics: Will they work when you really need them?” Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. http://www.cdc.gov/getsmart/campaign-materials/week/downloads/factsheet-Monday-GetSmart-week.pdf. Accessed September 2012.

2 Zadik Y and Levn L. Clinical Decision Making in Restorative Dentistry, Endodontics, and Antibiotic Prescription. Journal of Dental Education January 1, 2008 vol. 72 no. 1 81-86

3 Dar-Odeh NS, Abu-Hammad OA, et.al. Antibiotic prescribing practices by dentists: a review. Ther Clin Risk Manag. 2010; 6: 301–306.

Help Your Teeth Age Gracefully with You

Advances in medical technology, public health, personal health knowledge and greater access to health insurance are some of the key factors helping people in the U.S. today live longer and in better health than previous generations. The most recent data indicate that life expectancy from birth is at an all-time high of nearly 78 years, with women at 80.5 and men at 75.5 years.1

Improvements in oral health are also significant, and adults 65 and older are keeping more of their natural teeth for their entire lives than previous generations. During National Healthy Aging Month, Delta Dental is advising older adults that practicing good oral health habits is more important than ever.

The popular idiom “long in the tooth” references how gums wear away in the aging process, leaving the root of the tooth exposed. The tooth root is much softer and more prone to dental decay than the enamel that covers the tooth crown. Dental disease is cumulative over a lifetime, so almost all adults ages 65 and older have had dental caries in their permanent teeth.2 Older adults who take any one of several hundred medications that can cause a decrease in saliva should be especially careful because a lack of saliva brings a much higher risk for tooth decay.

Smart dental hygiene is important even for those seniors who have lost their regular teeth. Besides helping ensure dentures and other prosthetic replacements fit properly, dentists can catch life-threatening diseases like oral cancer early when they are at a more treatable stage.

Studies show that individuals with dental insurance are far less likely to have unmet dental needs than those with insurance, and are also more likely to get regular dental exams.3 However, once individuals retire they often neglect to purchase ongoing dental coverage. Medicare does not provide dental coverage but individual plans are available for purchase. Seniors can also check to see if membership in any national organizations or associations qualifies them to purchase dental benefits.

1 The 2012 Statistical Abstract.. The National Data Book. Data Source: U.S. National Center for Health Statistics, National Vital Statistics Reports (NVSR), Deaths: Preliminary Data for 2008, Vol. 59, No. 2, December 2010. Accessed August 27, 2012 at:http://www.census.gov/compendia/statab/2012/tables/12s0104.pdf

2 “Dental Caries (Tooth Decay) in Seniors (Age 65 and Over).” National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research. http://www.nidcr.nih.gov/DataStatistics/FindDataByTopic/DentalCaries/DentalCariesSeniors65older. Accessed August, 2012.

3 Bloom B, Simile CM, Adams PF, Cohen RA. Oral health status and access to oral health care for U.S. adults aged 18–64: National Health Interview Survey, 2008. National Center for Health Statistics. Vital Health Stat 10(253). 2012.