Delta Dental Offers Alternative Approach to Resolutions

Failure to keep New Year’s resolutions is so commonplace these days that it has become an easy punch line for many derisive jokes. Studies have found only eight percent of people actually keep their resolutions annually. Conversely, one out of four people have never successfully kept a New Year’s resolution.

Maybe the problem is how you think of these resolutions, and simply changing your mindset might help. In 2014, take a cue from the 2007 movie The Bucket List, and put together a list of things that you must do before the year ends.

We at Delta Dental suggest you consider including some oral health-related items in your bucket list. Dr. Bill Kohn, DDS, DDPA’s vice president of dental science and policy, has a few time-honored suggestions:

  • Brush/floss regularly: Commit to brushing your teeth twice a day for two minutes at a time. Simple tools like egg timers or mobile apps can help you keep track of the time. If you never, ever floss, pledge to do so more frequently (starting with once a week and increasing to once a day).
  • Easy on the sweets: Limit your consumption of sugary snacks because the more times teeth are exposed to sugar, the longer acids have time to attack tooth enamel – and expedite tooth decay!
  • Kick butts: Cigarette smoking is the primary cause of severe gum disease in the U.S., so do yourself a favor and quit using tobacco products. Your teeth, gums and lungs will thank you.

Fill your bucket list with things that will make you happy and healthy, provide some adventure, and encourage personal growth. The length of your list doesn’t matter, but you should write it down and refer to it regularly throughout the year. Keep it simple and try to do at least one thing on your list each month.

An appointment with your dentist should be at the top of any healthy checklist. Like most things that we value and want to keep working properly, a regular dental check-up and some preventive maintenance goes a long way towards maintaining long-term, disease-free oral health.

Delta Dental sends you our best wishes for a happy, healthy and prosperous 2014!

Delta Dental’s Top 5 Oral Health Resolutions for 2013

With a new calendar year on the horizon, many people are engaging in that time-honored American tradition of making resolutions, vowing to improve certain aspects of their lives.

For individuals who aspire to better their oral health in 2013, Delta Dental offers the following suggestions to help make these resolutions work.

• Brush/floss regularly: The uncomplicated daily one-two punch of brushing twice a day with fluoride toothpaste and flossing once is still the foundation for maintaining healthy teeth and gums. The sooner you can brush following a meal, the better. The longer food stays stuck to your teeth, the more acid is produced that erodes tooth enamel.

• Visit a dentist in 2013: Don’t delay making an appointment for a check-up. Dentists do more than just check and clean teeth. They can also check for signs of serious oral health problems like oral cancer and gum disease, answer questions and provide advice for adults and children and alert patients to signs of potential medical conditions.

• Avoid tobacco products: According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), half of the cases of severe gum disease in U.S. adults can be attributed to cigarette smoking, and the prevalence of gum disease is three times higher among smokers than non-smokers.1 Consuming products like cigarettes, cigars and smokeless tobacco is arguably the single most destructive oral health habit.

• Eat sweets in moderation: It was ancient Greek philosopher Aristotle who advised, “Moderation in all things” and that axiom rings especially true for sweet snacks. Tooth decay occurs when candy, cookies, sodas and other sweets, or simple carbohydrates like those in chips or crackers mix with bacteria in the sticky plaque that constantly forms on teeth to produce acid, which can destroy tooth enamel. Whenever possible, stick to having sweets with dinner and brush afterward if possible. Limit sugary snacks because the more times during the day that your teeth are exposed, the longer the acids attack.

• Wear a mouthguard during contact sports: It’s not just kids who play contact sports these days. Millions of adults participate in competitive sports leagues in which there can be significant risk of contact. Though there is insufficient evidence to suggest mouthguards prevent concussions, they do absorb and distribute the forces that impact the mouth, teeth, face and jaw when an athlete takes a shot to the face. Wearing a mouthguard can prevent chipped, fractured, displaced or dislodged teeth, fractured or displaced jaws, TMJ trauma, and lacerations to the lips and mouth that result from the edges of the teeth.

1 Preventing Cavities, Gum Disease, Tooth Loss, and Oral Cancer – 2011 At a Glance. http://www.cdc.gov/chronicdisease/resources/publications/AAG/doh.htm. Accessed 2012.

Resolve to Kick Butts in 2012

Of the nearly 8,000 deaths in the United States attributed to oral and pharyngeal cancer annually,1 about 75 percent are due to tobacco and heavy alcohol use.2   Resolving to quit smoking may be one of the most difficult challenges to undertake in 2012, but it also comes with some of the best life- and mouth-saving benefits.

A lifestyle factor that the Surgeon General calls “the single greatest avoidable cause of death,”3 smoking also drastically affects periodontal (gum) health.4-5 According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), half of the cases of severe gum disease in U.S adults can be attributed to cigarette smoking and the prevalence of gum disease is three times higher among smokers than nonsmokers.6

Smoking is the leading cause of oral and pharyngeal cancer and using tobacco in any form – including dipping snuff 7 or chewing – increases the risk of developing an oral cancer.8 Even if you’ve smoked for decades, you can reap nearly immediate benefits by quitting.9-11 Within 20 minutes, your heart rate drops, and within 12 hours, the carbon monoxide level in your blood returns to normal. Within one year, your added risk for coronary heart disease will fall to half that of a smoker’s, and within 15 years, your risk is that of a nonsmoker’s.10 Quitting reduces many of the cosmetic effects of smoking and can even improve sensitivity to smell and taste.

There are many reasons why smoking is a health risk, but here are the top five ways that kicking butts can immediately improve your oral health:

  1. It significantly reduces your risk of developing oral and pharyngeal cancer
  2. It reduces your risk of developing periodontal disease
  3. It improves the color of your teeth
  4. It can help eliminate halitosis (bad breath)
  5. It can help reduce dental decay12

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1 National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health – Oral Cancer http://www.cancer.gov/cancertopics/types/oral

2 Blot WJ, McLaughlin JK, Winn DM, et al. Smoking and drinking in relation to oral and pharyngeal cancer. Cancer Research 1988; 48(11):3282–3287

3 U.S. Dept. of Health and Human Services. The health conse­quences of smoking: A report of the Surgeon General. U.S. Dept. of Health and Human Services, CDC, National Center of Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health, 2004. Available at: “http://www.surgeongeneral.gov/library/smokingconsequences/”. Accessed June 29, 2010.

4 Tomar SL, Asma S. Smoking-attributable periodontitis in the United States: findings from NHANES III. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. . J Periodontol. 2000 May;71(5):743-51

5 “Longitudinal Study of the Association Between Smoking as a Periodontitis Risk and Salivary Biomarkers Related to Periodontitis.” M. Kibayashi. Journal of Periodontology. 2007, vol. 78, no. 5, pages 859–867.

6 Preventing Cavities, Gum Disease, Tooth Loss, and Oral Cancer – 2011 At A Glance. http://www.cdc.gov/chronicdisease/resources/publications/AAG/doh.htm. Accessed 2012.

7 Oral Cancer.” National Institutes of Health. July 2007. http://report.nih.gov/NIHfactsheets/ViewFactSheet.aspx?csid=106&key=O#O

8 “Oral Health Topics A-Z: Smoking (Tobacco) Cessation.” American Dental Association. http://www.ada.org/public/topics/smoking_tobacco_faq.asp. Accessed 2009.

9 “Quitting Smoking: Why to Quit and How to Get Help.” National Cancer Institute, August 17, 2007. www.cancer.gov/cancertopics/factsheet/Tobacco/cessation Accessed 2010.

10 “Guide to Quitting Smoking.” American Cancer Society, August 7, 2008. www.cancer.org/docroot/PED/content/PED_10_13X_Guide_for_Quitting_Smoking.asp Accessed 2008.

11 “Women and Smoking: Questions and Answers. ” National Cancer Institute, February 27, 2008. www.cancer.gov/cancertopics/factsheet/Tobacco/women Accessed 2010.

12  Rooban T, Vidya K, Joshua E, et.al. Tooth decay in alcohol and tobacco abusers. J Oral Maxillofac Pathol. 2011 Jan;15(1):14-21.