The Best and Worst Halloween Treats for Teeth

Little ghosts and goblins will trick-or-treat to collect as much candy as they can this Halloween, but it’s not just kids who will enjoy the treats. Nearly 80 percent of parents admit they eat their children’s Halloween candy, according to the Delta Dental Children’s Oral Health Survey.1 But some candies have the potential to do more damage to teeth than others.

The best way to protect teeth from decay is to have candy in small portions at limited times, such as after a meal, as dessert or at regular snack times. Nearly 90 percent of parents say their kids consume Halloween candy this way.Choose candy that melts and disappears quickly. The longer teeth are exposed to sugar, the longer bacteria can feed on it, which could produce cavity-causing acid.

While no sweets are good for teeth, some are less harmful than others. We rated the best and worst treats for teeth on a scale of 1 to 5, with 1 being least harmful.

  1. Sugar-free candy and gum with xylitol                                                                   Sugar-free foods don’t contain sugar that can feed on the bacteria in the mouth and produce decay-causing acids. Gum and candy with xylitol may actually protect teeth by reducing the acids produced by bacteria and increasing saliva to rinse away excess sugars and acids.
  • Our survey says 44 percent of kids eat sugar-free candy at Halloween.1
  1. Powdery candy (such as sugar straws)                                                                     Sure, powdery candy is packed with pure sugar. But powdery candy dissolves quickly and doesn’t stick to the teeth.
  1. Chocolate (such as candy bars)                                                                             Chocolate dissolves quickly in the mouth and can be eaten easily, which decreases the amount of time sugar stays in contact with teeth. And calcium could help protect tooth enamel. However, chocolate with fillings, such as caramel and nuts, is a lot more harmful for teeth than the plain variety.
  • Our survey says 86 percent of kids eat chocolate at Halloween. 1
  1. Hard candy (such as lollipops or mints)                                                                     Hard candy is tough on teeth because it tends to be sucked on at a leisurely pace for an extended period of time. Plus, chomping down on hard candy can chip or break teeth.
  • Our survey says 50 percent of kids eat hard candy at Halloween. 1
  1. Chewy candy (such as caramels or gummies)                                                         Chewy, sticky treats are particularly damaging because they are high in sugar, spend a prolonged amount of time stuck to teeth and are more difficult for saliva to break down.
  • Our survey says 57 percent of kids eat chewy candy at Halloween. 1

Another way to protect teeth is to give kids something other than candy.  Nearly 25 percent of parents hand out non-candy items to trick-or-treaters, such as toys, money or fruit.1

For additional tips on how to help keep children’s teeth healthy during Halloween and all year long, visit the Tooth Fairy’s Halloween website at www.toothfairytrickytreats.com.

1 Morpace Inc. conducted the 2013 Delta Dental Children’s Oral Health Survey. Interviews were conducted nationally via the Internet with 926 primary caregivers of children from birth to age 11. For results based on the total sample of national adults, the margin of error is ±3.2 percentage points at a 95 percent confidence level.

Top 4 Tips for Antibiotics Use

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) says that antibiotic resistance is one of the world’s most pressing public health problems. According to the CDC, an estimated 50 percent of antibiotic prescription use in hospitals is inappropriate or unnecessary.(1)

Other studies have found that dentists also may prescribe antibiotics unnecessarily.(2-3) During “Talk About Prescriptions Month,” Delta Dental advises people to be responsible about how they use antibiotics.

Antibiotics are powerful medicines that fight bacterial infections. They work by killing bacteria or preventing them from reproducing until the body’s immune system can fight off the rest of the infection. When prescribed and taken correctly, their value in helping cure or prevent the spread of disease is significant. Contrary to popular belief, antibiotics do not fight infections caused by viruses such as the common cold, flu and bronchitis.

Every time a person takes antibiotics, sensitive bacteria are killed, but resistant germs may be left to grow and multiply. These resistant germs can then be spread to others and over time, an antibiotic resistant strain of bacteria can become a community problem. Repeated and improper uses of antibiotics are primary causes of the increase in drug-resistant bacteria.

Dentists mainly prescribe antibiotics for the management of infections in and around the mouth, which are usually caused by bacteria. They are sometimes used after oral surgery as a preventive measure or to treat a toothache. Most common dental infections take the form of a toothache and require some type of treatment, like a filling, root canal therapy, or tooth extraction. Antibiotics cannot cure a toothache and are not always necessary after routine oral surgery.

Individuals who are taking antibiotics should keep a few things in mind:

Take the entire prescription: Even if your condition is improving and you feel cured, finish the prescription. If you stop too soon, some bacteria can survive and reinfect.

Only take antibiotics to treat a bacterial infection: People instinctively want to take medication to make them feel better, even if they just have the flu or common cold. Antibiotics only work on bacteria, however, and the common cold is usually a virus.

Don’t save the bottle for future reuse: Antibiotics degrade when they are stored for months at a time, rendering them ineffective. Check with your pharmacy for appropriate disposal of expired medications.

Don’t share your antibiotics with others: Antibiotics are prescribed for specific purposes. Your doctor will typically check for potential adverse interactions or drug allergies before prescribing.

1 “Antibiotics: Will they work when you really need them?” Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. http://www.cdc.gov/getsmart/campaign-materials/week/downloads/factsheet-Monday-GetSmart-week.pdf. Accessed September 2012.

2 Zadik Y and Levn L. Clinical Decision Making in Restorative Dentistry, Endodontics, and Antibiotic Prescription. Journal of Dental Education January 1, 2008 vol. 72 no. 1 81-86

3 Dar-Odeh NS, Abu-Hammad OA, et.al. Antibiotic prescribing practices by dentists: a review. Ther Clin Risk Manag. 2010; 6: 301–306.