Are Two Annual Dental Visits One Too Many – or Not Enough?

For decades, conventional wisdom held that certain dental procedures were best practices and were right for all people. You brushed your teeth after every meal (or at least morning and night) flossed daily, and visited the dentist twice a year. At each visit, you got an exam, X-rays and a cleaning. If you were a child, you could add on a fluoride treatment and perhaps sealants on your molar teeth.

However, thanks to advances in molecular medicine, genetics and other areas of research, health care in general (including oral health care) is being transformed from a system of treating disease in a one-size-fits-all manner to one that provides predictive, proactive, preventive and personalized care. Oral health care advances also allows for a more customized and tailored approach to each person’s individual situation.

Sure, basic prevention activities like brushing with fluoride toothpaste, flossing and drinking fluoridated water regularly is important for all. Based on risk factors, however, some people are considered at higher risk and some at lower risk for developing oral diseases like tooth decay, periodontal (gum) disease or oral cancer. Your risk for disease may help you determine what level of more costly professional services may be most beneficial. People with a history of good oral health, good dietary and oral hygiene habits, and no genetic red flags may need to only visit the dentist once a year or less. Conversely, those with a history of disease and other risk factors may need two or more routine visits each year.

A recent study published in the Journal of Dental Research looked at individual’s risk for periodontal disease and concluded that for low-risk individuals, “the association between preventive dental visits (dental cleaning) and tooth loss was not significantly different whether the frequency was once or twice annually.”1 It went on to recommend evaluating genetic tendencies for gum disease with conventional risk factors (smoking and diabetes) when assessing how often a patient needs to visit the dentist.1 While this study looked specifically at gum disease risk, risk factors are also established for other oral problems such as tooth decay and oral cancer.

In response to the JDR study, the American Dental Association released a statement to “remind consumers that the frequency of their regular dental visits should be tailored by their dentists to accommodate for their current oral health status and health history.” 2

For those who are unaware of their personal risk factors, Delta Dental provides an online tool (myDentalScore) that can help you self-assess your level of risk for gum disease, tooth decay and oral cancer. This self-assessment will provide you with valuable information to help you have a good discussion with your dentist about the best mix of self-care and professional care for you as an individual.

Ultimately, Delta Dental encourages consumers to honestly evaluate themselves and seek the kind of dental care that will be most beneficial to their oral health.

Patient Stratification for Preventive Care in Dentistry.  http://jdr.sagepub.com/content/early/2013/06/05/0022034513492336.abstract

2 American Dental Association. American Dental Association Statement on Dental Visits.  http://www.ada.org/8700.aspx

Dog Diffuses Dental Distress

According to the National Institutes of Health, more than 20 million Americans avoid going to the dentist out of fear.

Most dentists are well aware of their patients’ anxieties. They try to create a soothing environment where patients can feel calm and comfortable, beginning with an inviting waiting room and a caring, attentive staff. Some practices offer television, music, or even virtual reality glasses to entertain and distract nervous patients in the chair. Others employ pillows, blankets or aromatherapy to help their patients relax.

But one practitioner has found a unique solution to help his young patients conquer their dental phobia. The clinic of Dr. Paul Weiss, a pediatric dentist in Williamsville, N.Y., recently posted a photo on the popular website reddit that showed how he uses his golden retriever Brooke to act as a therapy dog to calm nervous young patients. According to MSN.com, Brooke is bathed before each visit and Weiss’s office is cleaned after she leaves to maintain proper sanitation.

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